How do you treat a baby with the flu?

How can I treat my baby’s flu at home?

Safe home remedies for your child’s cough, cold, or flu

  1. Lots of rest (all ages)
  2. Extra fluids (all ages)
  3. Humidity to help thin mucus (all ages)
  4. Saline drops and nasal aspirator (all ages)
  5. Elevating the head (12 months and up)
  6. Warm liquids and chicken soup (6 months and up)

What is the best medicine for flu in babies?

Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) in liquid form will likely be used. After talking about the risk of side effects against the possible complications of the flu in your baby, you and your provider may decide to use this medicine to treat the flu. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) help lower fever in children.

What helps a baby with flu and cough?

Warm or very cold liquids make excellent toddler cough remedies because they thin out mucus, which makes it easier to cough up. Plus, liquids soothe a raw throat and keep your little one hydrated. Have your child drink ice water, cold or warm juice, or decaffeinated tea mixed with honey.

When should I take my child to the hospital for the flu?

Children of all ages should be taken to the ER for flu if they experience any of the following emergency warning signs: Have shortness of breath or difficulty breathing. Become unresponsive. Suffer from excessive vomiting.

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What happens if a baby gets the flu?

You don’t want to take any chances. When your baby has the flu, they could be at risk for complications, such as sinus and ear infections and pneumonia — especially if they’re under 6 months old. Quick treatment can help prevent trouble.

At what stage is flu contagious?

When Flu Spreads

People with flu are most contagious in the first three to four days after their illness begins. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick.

Can a baby suffocate from a stuffy nose?

A baby’s nose, unlike an adult’s, doesn’t have cartilage. So when that nose is pressed against an object, like a stuffed animal, couch cushions or even a parent’s arm while sleeping in bed, it can flatten easily. With the opening to its nostrils blocked, the baby can’t breathe and suffocates.