Quick Answer: Do pediatricians support baby led weaning?

Baby-led introduction of complementary foods is a practice gaining in popularity among families with infants ready for the change from breast milk or formula to table foods, but it must be done in a developmentally appropriate way. Pediatricians, therefore, need to be aware of the best practices for BLW.

Does the AAP recommend baby-led weaning?

Another method of introducing solid foods to babies is called baby-led weaning (BLW). … A recent study by the AAP determined that babies are not at a higher risk of choking from BLW than they are with traditional purees. Regardless of the food method, it’s always a good idea for parents to know infant CPR, Chrisman says.

Is baby-led weaning evidence based?

Overall, although there is limited evidence suggesting that a baby-led approach may encourage positive outcomes, limitations of the data leave these conclusions weak. Further research is needed, particularly to explore pathways to impact and understand the approach in different contexts and populations.

Is baby-led weaning healthy?

It may have various benefits, but, as with any weaning method, it’s important to keep certain safety considerations in mind. Baby-led weaning can make it easier for parents to feed their babies and may promote good eating behaviors, protect your baby against excess weight gain, and reduce fussiness around food.

Is Baby led weaning a choking hazard?

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends introducing babies to solid foods when they are between 4 and 6 months of age. … A new New Zealand study found that baby-led weaning did not cause more choking than traditional spoon-feeding. Still, the researchers discovered that both styles led to unsafe accidents.

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How common is choking with BLW?

The only existing data on choking in BLW come from our BLISS research group, a small survey reporting similar “ever” choking rates of 31% to 40% in BLW infants and 31% in conventionally fed infants. There are a number of possible explanations for infants so frequently being offered foods that pose a choking risk.

Is baby-led weaning better than spoon-feeding?

Some parents worry that baby-led weaning is more likely to cause their baby to choke than spoon-feeding. But there is no evidence for this. Baby-led weaning can be messier than spoon-feeding. Whether you’re spoon-feeding or baby-led weaning, you’re bound to have some mess at this age.