What causes speech delays in babies?

Speech delays in an otherwise normally developing child can sometimes be caused by oral impairments, like problems with the tongue or palate (the roof of the mouth). A short frenulum (the fold beneath the tongue) can limit tongue movement for speech production.

When should you worry if your child is not talking?

If your child is over two years old, you should have your pediatrician evaluate them and refer them for speech therapy and a hearing exam if they can only imitate speech or actions but don’t produce words or phrases by themselves, they say only certain words and only those words repeatedly, they cannot follow simple …

How can I stop my baby’s speech delay?

How Can Parents Help?

  1. Focus on communication. Talk with your baby, sing, and encourage imitation of sounds and gestures.
  2. Read to your child. Start reading when your child is a baby. …
  3. Use everyday situations. To build on your child’s speech and language, talk your way through the day.

What is the most common cause of speech delay?

MENTAL RETARDATION. Mental retardation is the most common cause of speech delay, accounting for more than 50 percent of cases.

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Does delay in speech mean autism?

Parents of young children with autism often report delayed speech as their first concern, but speech delay is not specific to autism. Delayed speech is also present in young children with global developmental delay caused by intellectual disability and those with severe to profound hearing loss.

Are late talkers less intelligent?

To be sure, most late talking children do not have high intelligence. … The same is true for bright late-talking children: It is important to bear in mind that there is nothing wrong with people who are highly skilled in analytical abilities, even when they talk late and are less skilled with regard to language ability.

Do boys talk later than girls?

Boys tend to develop language skills a little later than girls, but in general, kids may be labeled “late-talking children” if they speak less than 10 words by the age of 18 to 20 months, or fewer than 50 words by 21 to 30 months of age.

Can delayed speech be corrected?

If your child does have a delay, they might need speech therapy. A therapist can work with them on how to pronounce words and sounds, and strengthen the muscles in their face and mouth. You can also work with your child on speech and language: Talk with them throughout the day.

What age is considered speech delayed?

Your child may have a speech delay if he or she isn’t able to do these things: Say simple words (such as “mama” or “dada”) either clearly or unclearly by 12 to 15 months of age. Understand simple words (such as “no” or “stop”) by 18 months of age.

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Why do speech delays happen?

These happen when there’s a problem in the areas of the brain responsible for speech. This makes it hard to coordinate the lips, tongue, and jaw to make speech sounds. These kids also might have other oral-motor problems, such as feeding problems. Hearing problems also can affect speech.

Can hearing problems cause speech delay?

Hearing loss can affect a child’s development of speech and language skills. When a child has difficulty hearing, the areas of the brain used for communication may not develop appropriately. This makes understanding and talking very difficult.

Is it normal for a 2 year old not to talk?

You may notice that your child’s development goes at its own unique pace. And that’s OK — at least most of the time. Still, if you’re worried that your 2-year-old isn’t talking as much as their peers, or that they’re still babbling versus saying actual words, it’s a valid concern.

What are the stages of speech development?

Stages of Speech and Language Development

  • 3 – 6 months. Listening & Attention. Watches face when someone talks. …
  • 6 – 12 months. Listening & Attention. …
  • 12 – 15 months. Listening & Attention. …
  • 15 – 18 months. Listening & Attention. …
  • 18 – 2 years. Listening & Attention. …
  • 2 – 3 years. Listening & Attention. …
  • 4 – 5 years. Listening & Attention.