Quick Answer: How much Zyrtec can a 6 month old have?

Can I give my 6 month old Zyrtec?

Children 6 months to < 2 years: The recommended dose of ZYRTEC syrup in children 6 months to 23 months of age is 2.5 mg (½ teaspoon) once daily. The dose in children 12 to 23 months of age can be increased to a maximum dose of 5 mg per day, given as ½ teaspoonful (2.5 mg) every 12 hours.

Is it safe to give Zyrtec to babies?

Allergy Help for Infants

Most over-the-counter (OTC) allergy meds are considered safe for kids 2 years of age and older. Oral antihistamines like Claritin (loratadine), Zyrtec (cetirizine), and Allegra (fexofenadine) are available OTC in kid-friendly formulations.

Can I give my 6 month old Claritin?

There is an infant concentration (50 mg per 1.25 ml) and a children’s concentration (100 mg per 5 ml). Either one is ok to use in any age child. (Brand names: Benadryl, Claritin, Zyrtec and others) For allergies, don’t use under 1 year of age.

Can a 6 month old have Benadryl?

I usually only recommend Benadryl for infants and actually only recommend it for infants six months or younger,” explains Dr. Marks-Cogan. “For infants six months or older I usually recommend children’s Zyrtec, which is also an antihistamine.

Does Zyrtec make infants sleepy?

Drowsiness, tiredness, and dry mouth may occur. Stomach pain may also occur, especially in children. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

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How do you treat allergies in babies?

Your doctor may recommend child-safe OTC or prescription antihistamines and/or prescribe nasal sprays in certain cases to reduce the allergic response and/or swelling. Allergy shots may be given too, but usually not until a child is a little older.

What does allergy rash look like on babies?

A food allergy rash is raised, very itchy, and usually red or pink. It creates red, raised bumps on the skin. These bumps are usually rounded, and often have red flares around them. They are usually called hives, but are sometimes called wheals, urticaria or nettle rash.